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Brodtener Ufer

Brodtener Ufer

The photo above was shot at the Brodtener Ufer, a 2.5 miles long steep coast near Lübeck. You can see more photos of that area here.

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10 Comments »

  1. It reminds me a lot of Hallett Cove, where I used to live in South Australia. There were cliffs and a rocky beach with glacial erratics, large standing rocks left over from the ice age. Hallett Cove is a geologically significant area but also a quiet beach where I used to enjoy a walk every day with my dogs.

    • I googled this, Hallett Cove looks interesting and I see the similarity, although Hallett Cove looks even more interesting. Brodtener Ufer is more flat at the top.

      • Yes I see that when I looked at your other photos but the rocky beach reminded me. It was nearly lost to development but luckily protected in time because the rest of the surrounding area is suburbs now.

        • That would have been sad. I am glad when areas like this one are protected, but I wish the radius would be much bigger. Places like these should stay untouched with a large radius around them.

          Here in Germany some areas are protected as well, but then they create small areas for the rich that are allowed to build and live very close to “nature wonders”. These might be small areas but still this is injustice and mockery when they speak of protection and a kilometer down the path from there it’s allowed to buy land. When you then see signs with about 20 rules including things like “Don’t leave the path nor will you go through the reed or disturb animals”, while some rich just were allowed to level a 100x100meter area of reed to create a garden and lawn in front of their villas and directly at the water, you start to think protection is total hypocrisy, and that it’s more about protecting the rich, making them have a quite place to enjoy life very close to wildlife and nature.

          I’d generally support all the rules, and the protection of areas, but at least here in Germany it often looks like total hypocrisy because rules only count for certain groups, while others, depending on their size of wallet get advantaged.

          Fortunately, it is unlikely that anyone will build near the Brodtener Ufer… because it’s losing 50 to 100 cm per year due to storm, waves, rain and because it’s mostly sand and propably not the safest place for development. At the end and start there is already architecture close, but the 2.5 miles are mostly loney, there are just fields and hiking trails behind it, or trees. I like that. And I hope it won’t change in the future.

        • I hope so too. What you say is very true. There seem to be different rules for the rich. We create conservation areas but then the government allows developers to build holiday resorts in them, expensive ones of course. If an old building is to be saved it is often by turning it into a luxury hotel or apartments. All the good places are for the rich while the rest of us can only look on at places we were once able to enjoy. It makes me very angry.

        • Yeah it’s sad. I don’t care how much money a person or business has, but it makes me angry too that they can just take places anywhere, even where we all should protect the nature. You have a good example, I saw documentaries where whole islands were badly affected by tourism, including suffering biology.

          Or like we discussed once in one of my Schellbruch posts… they actually planned to expand the harbor but fortunately the citizens successfully fought the plans and today it’s a conservation area. So, at least sometimes there is success. But I am afraid that future generations might care less. I hope I am wrong.

    • It is often lonely there. When I hike this section, I maybe meet around 4 people… sometimes other hikers, or sometimes fishers. But it’s a quite place and you just hear the Baltic Sea. I like that. 🙂

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